Wrestling/Sports Photographers Gallery

Everyone has a inspiration. Especially in what you love. Such as Sports, you maybe in Baseball and like players such as Mike Trout or Clayton Kershaw. In photography, I like other Photographers and when i look at their work and say “Wow I wanna do something like that.” And make me wanna go out their and take a Camera and start shooting Pro Wrestling events, a Baseball game or a Football game. Here are a few of my favorite photographers and their photos.

Scott Lesh Ringside Photography is one of my inspirations to do Professional Wrestling photography. Well, better yet one of my favorite Pro Wrestling Photographers. He’s covered at least 20+ promotions and events of Pro Wrestling. His work has even been featured on the WWE’s (World Wrestling Entertainment) website. He has mentioned that his photographs are taking from Sony mirrorless cameras. So here are a few of my favorite photographs from Mr. Scott Lesh himself. 

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Steve Wright Jr. is a Navy Seal Veteran and Photographer. He’s a Wedding, Model, and Pro Wrestling photography. I love his Photography work. His work With WWE and New Japan Pro Wrestling is amazing. Throughout his perseverance during his time with the Navy Seal, it didn’t stop him from doing what he loves. Tragically, he lost his leg from the Navy. His story is truly a one of a kind. And it’s a definition of never giving up. Here is some of Steve Wright Jr’s work. 

Neil Leifer grew up on the Lower East Side of Manhattan in New York City. At the age of thirteen, Leifer was introduced to photography through the Henry Street Settlement House, which offered free classes to the poor children of the neighborhood. Leifer began taking sports pictures, since it combined the two things that he liked. When he wasn’t doing photography as a youth, Leifer had odd jobs, such as shining shoes and delivering sandwiches. Eventually, he saved enough money to buy his first camera. Leifer was also known for taking risks. For the 1966 heavyweight title fight between Cleveland Williams and Muhammad Ali, he placed a camera in the rafters of the Houston Astrodome in order to get a shot of the canvas when the victor knocked out his competition, also he regards this as his favorite photograph from a 40-year professional career. His shot of Ali and a defeated Williams has been seen by millions and was voted the greatest sport photo ever by The Observer

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Brad Mangin is a Bay Area freelance sports photographer. Mangin has done eight cover shots for Sports Illustrated. Mangin graduated from San Jose State in a degree in photojournalism. His work featured in the San Francisco Giant’s books from their 2010, 2012, and 2014 World Series Championships titled Worth The Wait, NEVER. SAY. DIE, and Championship. All three books started from their Arizona Spring Training to their Championship Parades in Downtown San Francisco. He’s been a MLB photographer since 1987 and Sports illustrated contributor since 1993 until 2016. 

Eric Johnson is a official WWE Photographer. He takes photographs ringside, back stage, and also photographers to promote their WWE Merchandise for the WWE official merchandise website, WWEshop.com. He has been a WWE Photographer for over 10 years. He is one of my favorite WWE Photographers, His shots are amazing and creative. Her are some of his work from WWE over the years. 

Al Bello graduated with a Liberal Arts degree from the University of New York at Stony Brook in 1989. In March of 1990 Al worked as Darkroom Manager for The Ring boxing magazine. Al soon found his way by photographing boxing on a weekend basis while processing, and printing film during the week. In 1993 Al landed a position as a junior photographer at Allsport which is now a part of Getty images. Since Joining Getty, Al has become Chief Sports Photographer in North America on a very talented staff. He is assigned to cover sporting events and people in sport worldwide. He has just finished covering his Eleventh Olympic Games in Rio Brazil, in 2016. Al’s photographic skills extend beyond event coverage. He enjoys doing work with athlete’s one on one. He is competent in studio and on location lighting. Al is fully capable of transmitting photos on site. He also enjoys doing feature stories involving sport. Some of Al’s picture stories include “Cockfighting in Puerto Rico” “Santa Claus School” and a photo essay in 4×5 format on “The Faces of Boxing” . Al has won various awards from World Press Photo, National Press Photographers Association, Pictures of the Year International, China International Press Photographers Association, The New York Press Photographers Association, The Boxing Writers Association, The Football Hall of Fame, The Baseball Hall of Fame, FINA, and The International Olympic Committee.  

Upon attending Arts Center College of Design in Pasadena, California, Gossage began working in a studio and more specifically, in the darkroom. Although the digital age has made a darkroom almost obsolete, Barry accredits the traditional photo development process as a critical component of his skill set and a strong influence in his love for black and white photography. Proving that destiny often does the choosing, Gossage received destiny’s knock in the form of the NBA back in 1989. The first NBA game he was ever hired to shoot professionally – which was coincidentally the first NBA game he had ever attended – featured a matchup between Magic Johnson’s Lakers and Michael Jordan’s Bulls. That was only topped by signing his first full-time gig as a team photographer with the Orlando Magic in 1992. As a rookie photographer, he was able to chart his career in the NBA with another fellow rookie in Orlando: future Hall of Famer and friend, Shaquille O’Neal. The two would work together for years as they both made their way around the NBA, with Gossage eventually finding a home in Phoenix in 1996. In his lengthy career, Gossage has shot for nearly every major sports magazine in the country, including Slam and ESPN the Magazine. He’s shot the NBA Finals, the MLB All-Star Game, the World Series and in 1995, and his work even appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated. As a team employee of the Arizona Diamondacks and the Suns, he’s accumulated three championship rings: one with the D-Backs and two with the Mercury. With an illustrious sports resume under his belt, Gossage has now evolved into opening full-service photography studio in Phoenix called “Studio 3D.” The space is named after Gossage’s business partner, current NBA player and photo enthusiast, Boris Diaw.

Richard Wade is a New York based photographer from Belfast, Northern Ireland.  Wade is the recipient of a Fulbright award and received an MFA in photography from Parsons School of Design in New York. His work has been exhibited in the United States, Europe, Asia, Russia and Australia.

C L I E N T S / P U B L I C A T I O N S
Financial Times, Billboard Magazine, WWE, ESPN, Rolling Stone, Forbes, Surface Magazine, IGN, BBC, Van Morrison, Crossfit, Atlantic Philanthropies, Samsung Mobile USA, Edelman, Parsons School of Design, Ring of Honor,  Pitchfork, NPR, Chicago Tribune,  Chicago Sun Times, Magnum Foundation, Washington Post, Hauser & Wirth Institute

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